Archive for September, 2010

Media Review: Merlin

Sep
27
1 COMMENT • This post is filed under: Media Monday

Image belongs to the BBC

Title: Merlin
Media Type: TV Show
Genre: Fantasy
Season/Episode: 3.1-3

Summary: (made up from the top of my head, cause I couldn’t find a decent one anywhere). Merlin moves to Camelot to live with his mother’s friend Gaius, court physician to Uther Pendragon. Once there, Merlin finds himself servant to the King’s son Arthur, and struggling to hide his magic in a society that outlawed magic 20 years before.

Review: This show is what would happen if you took the characters from the famous Arthur legend, and then took the rest of the story and chucked it out the window! Arthur raised by Sir Kay? Gone. Merlin living his life backwards? Nope. Sword in a stone? Yeah right! Well, not yet anyways. Call me a BBC freak if you want, but I just love it. (Just to point out – I started watching the show when NBC bought the rights last summer, and I had no idea it was a BBC show when I started.)

One of the things I highly enjoy is the relationship between Merlin and Arthur which couldn’t be there if there was an age difference, or if Merlin was Arthur’s tutor. Merlin is so snarky about Arthur and somehow manages to teach him how to not be a knucklehead at the same time. One of my favorite lines in the entire series is from the very first episode. Merlin has just met Arthur for the first time, and Arthur has been particularly annoying. Merlin asserts that he could best Arthur in a fight despite his smaller size (boasting about his magic without thinking about the consequences).

[Arthur] I warn you, I’ve been training to fight since birth.
[Merlin] Really? And how long have you been training to be a prat?
[Arther] You can’t address me like that!
[Merlin] Right, I’m sorry. How long have you been training to be a prat [pause] Milord. (sarcastically)

OK, so you have to watch it, but really, you have to watch it. The CGI is fairly impressive – one of the main characters is a dragon, imprisoned in the basement of the castle. The actors play strongly written characters and are so wonderfully cast that even the “backstage” moments (yes, I’m that much of a dork) seem to be about the characters.

Now, obviously, as we’re in the third season, I’m going to be specifically reviewing the third season. Anyone who wants to watch this from the beginning of the first season SPOILERS AHEAD.

The beginning of this season was a little disappointing for me – I’ve seen what they can do and as a premiere the first two episodes felt a little anticlimactic. We just got rid of a character that I was getting tired of in the finale of the previous season and by the end of the first episode they had shown up again. There’s another character (I’m trying very hard not to spoil, can you tell?) who has started to annoy me, not because of the poor job the actress does, but because of the way the character has progressed. I was almost sure we had finally made a turning point, but it only seemed to make it worse. I mean really, how stupid can Uther get? And no that’s not who I’m most annoyed at, I’m just annoyed that he doesn’t notice! UGH!!!

I thought the same would be true of the third episode. From the trailer it looked like a filler episode, and fillers on Merlin are rarely more than mediocre. It exceeded my expectations in every way. This is probably one of the most hilarious episodes in the entire series. The Goblin Merlin releases creates havoc, which I spent the whole time laughing at, and seriously? Bradley James as a donkey? Soooooo funny! As far as I can tell he did it entirely without artificial help, and it came out pretty much perfectly. On the other hand they found a way to make it really serious in the end, making me believe it in the end.

And the music is fabulous, as usual. Rob Lane has his own strange little style that I can’t tell if it’s quoting on purpose or cleverly using topic theory to create something new. I especially loved the new tracks I heard, and I can’t wait for the release of the next soundtrack.

So, overall, great show that I personally think everyone watch. Then again, why would I keep watching through the third season if it wasn’t good?

Upcoming Reviews:
Incarceron by Catherine Fisher
Iron Daughter by Julie Kagawa
Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
Hex Hall by Rachel Hawkins
City of Ashes by Cassandra Clare





You know you’re too busy when an entire week goes by with 5 reviews on the table and not one of them gets published. Sorry about that. But, I’m going to make an effort. Really I am!

Book number: 23/26 (I’m reviewing them together cause they’re books 1 and 2 of the same series).
Pages: lots… um, probably at least 400 each
By: Jasper Fforde (yes there are two F’s in a row, if you take one out you won’t find it.)

Summary: (from the back cover of The Eyre Affair)

Meet Thursday Next, literary detective without equal, fear or boyfriend.

There is another 1985, where London’s criminal gangs have moved into the lucrative literary market, and Thursday Next is on the trail of the new crime wave’s Mr. Big. Acheron Hades has been kidnapping characters from works of fiction and holding them to ransom. Jane Eyre is gone. Missing.

Thursday sets out to find a way into the book to repair the damage. But solving crimes against literature isn’t easy when you also have to find time to halt the Crimean War, persuade the man you love to marry you, and figure out who really wrote Shakespeare’s plays.

Review:

These are both rereads for me, and they both were read in pretty much one sitting. Remember when I told you about the Book Vault a couple posts ago? I found both of these there, for like, cheaper than I have ever expected to pay a book (including when I first started getting gift cards for Christmas, and could regularly get two on a $10 gift card. Those were the days *sigh*). I spent the rest of the day rereading The Eyre Affair and it was just as good as I remembered it to be.

I feel I should explain further than the summary. The summary makes it seem too normal. This is the world every book lover has ever dreamed of – books have taken center stage (literary forgery is punishable under the death penalty) and there’s even a branch of police are devoted to their protection and authentication. Of course, it’s not all fun and games – the Crimean War (yes it’s real, though it lasted for like 2 minutes in relation to most of what we talk about in history) has continued to the present day with mandatory draft for all young adults, and there are evil villains that would put even the worst criminals in our world to shame. Oh, and Thursday’s Uncle Mycroft (yes, there is a reason he has the same name as Sherlock’s brother) has invented a machine that lets you get inside a book. Frankly if that’s not an advertisement in itself, I don’t know what is.

Jasper Fforde has that slightly snide, snarky tone of writing that I happen to love. It’s as if he’s making fun of everyone and everything, even though he doesn’t really mean it in a mean way. He finds way to point out all those little things that when you take a second look you realize that they don’t make sense. It’s all about thinking in a different way, and learning to see other options, and I love that.

Of course, it always helps when the “point” is set so beautifully. Thursday is so wonderfully spunky, you can’t help but love her. The secondary characters are all just as well crafted – I have this funny feeling that you could as Fforde a question about the personal habits of any one of the secondaries and he wouldn’t even have to think about the answer, that’s how real they feel. Bowden is lovably docile and timid (think Jon Arbuckle from Garfield), Spike is jumpy like he’s hyped up on caffeine constantly but still has his moments, and Jack Schitt is the company CEO/strongarm all over! (and no, I didn’t just swear, that really is his name – names are important in this series, so pay attention as you read).

I suppose most people would consider this a really fluffy read, compared to his most recent novel Shades of Grey which is a dystopian novel with an important moral that is threaded throughout the plot. For me personally, though, this series speaks better to me, appealing to my love of reading and my sense of humour, while reminding me of all kinds of issues that are important: How do you deal with the fact that a decision you made affected someone you loved, and not in a good way? When what you believe is right and what is the law conflict, what do you do? When should you ask permission, and when should you just ask forgiveness?

Anyway, I highly recommend this series to anyone and everyone (over the age of… probably 12 or 13).

WARNING: This novel contains unannounced Time-travel. If you do not like time travel or if, as one of my friends puts it, “makes my head hurt cause I can’t make it make sense” then don’t read it – or at least read it forewarned.

Upcoming reviews (as soon as I have time I promise):
Incarceron by Catherine Fisher
Iron Daughter by Julie Kagawa
Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
City of Ashes by Cassandra Clare

And a Media review of the most recent series of Merlin





Insanity + Book Review: Fire

Sep
18
2 COMMENTS • This post is filed under: Book Review

I may be insane. If I’m not already, I will be by the time the end of the semester rolls around.

About a month ago, my dad received an email about a conference in Germany about film music. The focus is “Children’s music vs Child-like music” and the relation to adults, with the added aspect of film. I just happened to have a paper already written that almost fit the prompt, so I tweaked the topic a bit, put an abstract together, and sent it off just to see – I’ve never sent a paper to a conference before, so I honestly didn’t know whether it was likely to get accepted or not.

The good news? I’ve been accepted. OMG, I’m going to Germany over Thanksgiving break!!! The bad news? There is a good chance of me going insane between now and then. Not only do I have to finish writing the paper (they’ve asked me for double the time plus video clips), I now have to pretty much finish all my final projects for school AND put together all my graduate auditions before I leave. That said… well sorry guys, but my posts may get rather sporadic. I’ll try my best, but honestly, there’s only so many hours in a day.

But, for a little while anyways, I’ve got a backlog of reviews, so hopefully I won’t be too busy to at least type those up for your reading pleasure =D

So!

Fire Fire by
Series: Graceling Realm #2
Published by in 2009
Genres: ,
Pages: 580
Source:
Goodreads

It is not a peaceful time in the Dells. The young King Nash clings to his throne while rebel lords in the north and south build armies to unseat him. The mountains and forests are filled with spies and thieves and lawless men.

This is where Fire lives. With a wild irresistible appearance and hair the colour of flame, Fire is the last remaining human monster. Equally hated and adored, she has the unique ability to control minds, but she guards her power, unwilling to steal the secrets of innocent people. Especially when she has so many of her own.

Then Prince Brigan comes to bring her to King City. The royal family needs her help to uncover the plot against the king. Far away from home, Fire begins to realize there's more to her power than she ever dreamed. Her power could save the kingdom.

If only she weren't afraid of becoming the monster her father was.

Review:

Have you ever read one of those books that you’ve just loved but weren’t sure why? I mean, I pretty much knew I was going to love this one because I loved Graceling but still. I flew through this one (as best I could between classes) and didn’t even stop to take notes or anything. Not so helpful for writing reviews, but man was it refreshing!

One of the things I did notice is despite the YA label, Cashore does not treat this as a YA novel. If this were a Harry Potter novel, the publisher could probably just slap a different cover on it and sell it as a regular adult fantasy novel, and it would do just as well. This is because Cashore doesn’t shy away from the big issues. It’s very obvious from the beginning that Archer and Fire are more than friends, but less than dating, and Archer’s tendency to sleep with anything that wears a skirt is not hidden. Several times Brigan comes home beaten and bruised from the war, and is described in detail that made even my stomach turn. And quite frankly, the main issue of the novel – whether or not it is morally right to read someone’s mind and from that influence them into doing something, even when they are an enemy and the only way to save many people from dying is to do so – is not a kid’s issue. It brings up issues that adults and teens face every day, and it doesn’t give a real solution. The right to privacy is a huge issue, especially with our modern technology, and teens are subject to the issue just as much as adults.

Then, of course, I have to mention the negatives as well. The main thing I didn’t like about this novel is the ending. It’s just too pat for me. It happens too quickly, almost like she had been given a page count to hit and was starting to run out, so she just decided to end the novel as quickly as possible. There were so many things unaddressed, and not just cliff-hanger type things – major plot points! (I should probably say here, that I’m mostly going on my memory of the book – if the major plot points were addressed it was solely as a “oh and by the way…” type thing.) It was as if half way through the book, the fact that they were on the brink of war stopped being a necessary impetus for Fire’s actions and therefore she ignored it and let it fade into the background. If you’re going to write something, then finish it! If you go over your page limit, so what?! If your publishers will only publish it as an Adult novel, I say go for it! Cashore’s story is good enough that it could easily get a good audience in the adult genre, and then I wouldn’t feel so much like I was left hanging.

Wow, that makes it sound like I hated the book. I didn’t, I promise. I really did love it, though perhaps not as much as Graceling, and I would definitely recommend it to everyone, not just the YA audience it was intended for. Just be forewarned – don’t get so involved in it that when she switches focus you can’t follow. I did, and I think my reading suffered for it.

Upcoming reviews:
The Eyre Affair and Lost in a Good Book by Jaspar Fforde
Incarceron by Catherine Fisher
Iron Daughter by Julie Kagawa
Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins





Book Blogger Hop 8

Sep
17
14 COMMENTS • This post is filed under: Community Events

Book Blogger Hop

It’s that time of the week again =) This week’s “question” is: In honor of Book Blogger Appreciation Week tell us about your favorite book blogger.

This one is difficult for me. A lot of people can talk about the blogger who inspired them to start, but I decided to start book blogging on my own (I knew there were probably other people out there who reviewed books on their blogs, but I had never met/seen them). Another option is a blogger’s best blogging friend, but I’m not that good at making friends, and I’m not that great at commenting on other people’s blogs (I want my comments to be meaningful, not just “great job” on every post – I feel like that can get trite and old, and you start to wonder if they really mean it, especially if it’s the same person every time). So it’s difficult to pick a few reviewers out as “favorites.”

But I suppose if I have to pick a few:


Candace was one of the first to follow me, and is always doing interesting things. The books she reviews are almost always ones that I am interested in, and I like her reviewing style.

Jessica at “Fanatic’s Book Blog” is another one that I just love her style of reviews. Though sometimes her tastes differ from mine, I will usually at least read through all of her reviews just to check if it’s something I need to put on my TBR pile.

I’d also like to mention a few who are perhaps less well known, but I love what they’re doing:

The people over at Literary Soundtrack are doing something amazing (at least to me) – they’re putting books to music! Now as a music major myself, I find myself doing this all the time, and I love to see other peoples opinions. Of course, I tend to do it from a classical music standpoint, as I’m studying classical music and I have a strong interest in film music, which when heard alone can often be disguised as classical music. But I still love what they’re doing, and look forward to every single post.

And finally, Emily from Dragon’s Ate my Homework. I think her title is so clever, and she often has meaningful comments on my posts, which I really enjoy.

Whew, that was a long “question.” Don’t feel bad if I didn’t mention you – I had to pick favorites after all. Anyway, thanks for stopping by, leave a comment with your blog address and I’ll try to return the favor.

Recent Reviews:
The Shadow Dragons by James Owen

Upcoming Reviews:
Fire by Kristin Cashore
The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde
Incarceron by Catherine Fisher
Iron Daughter by Julie Kagawa
Hex Hall by Rachel Hawkins
(Yes I know I got behind – that’s what a weekend away and a personal read-a-thon, combined with catching a cold a few days later will do to you)





Book Review: The Shadow Dragons

Sep
14
0 COMMENTS • This post is filed under: Book Review

I have far too much to catch up on! This past weekend, the Honors department at my uni sponsored a trip to Stratford CA for the Shakespeare festival. I went (it was fabulous), saw Christopher Plummer as Prospero in the Tempest (OMG I can die happy now, lol) and most importantly, I read. Pretty much everyone else went shopping, but I brought a stack of books a foot tall and took the entire trip as my own private read-a-thon. It worked. I made it through three and a half books in two days. Of course, that means I am now 5 reviews behind =/

But before we get to the review, I have to give a little plug. One of the things I look forward to every time I go to Stratford (besides the awesome theatre) is the bookstore. If you are ever in Stratford, YOU MUST GO TO THE BOOK VAULT!!! It’s this tiny little storefront on Erie Street, sandwiched in between a cafe and a furniture store. BUT, they have the best sales EVER! While there this weekend, I bought 4 books. Retail price: approx $60 CDN. Price I paid: approx $10 CDN. No kidding. I love this store. Unfortunately, they don’t have a website I can link you to, other than the lists of “This is where to shop in this city” which are frankly not very helpful. But it’s not that hard to find, so if you ever find yourself in the area, go check it out!!!

The Shadow Dragons The Shadow Dragons by
Series: Chronicles of the Imaginarium Geographica #4
Published by in 2009
Genres: ,
Pages: 432
Source:
Goodreads

War is coming in the fourth entry of The Chronicles of the Imaginarium Geographica. The Winter King’s Shadow is using the Spear of Destiny to make a shadow army in the Archipelago of Dreams, while World War II looms in the real world. As the Caretakers of the Imaginarium Geographica meet with past legendary Caretakers, the Grail Child and her companions search for a mythic sword.

My Review:

I have been waiting for this book for a VERY long time. It’s the fourth book in my absolute favorite series, The Chronicles of the Imaginarium Geographica, and it was set to come out almost immediately after I left for England. I was very frustrated, because I wanted it NOW. Unfortunately, after reading it, I’m starting to feel my desperation was a bit unwarranted.

That’s not to say it’s all bad. In fact there were several things I liked. A lot of this series is about pulling on things that you already know – the Archipelago is a sort of collection of every story you’ve ever heard/read so it’s all there. By the time you get to the fourth in a series, it’s pretty likely that you’ll be running out of references, but Owen just delves deeper, bringing up references to books that I only just barely remember reading. He also uses very modern references – one that stuck out to me was one to the Abhorsen trilogy by Garth Nix, though I have since learned that the reference wasn’t originally his. I have so much fun trying to pick out what he means by everything he says, that I sometimes forget to read the bits about plot.

Unfortunately, though, this one felt like it dragged. It took me forever to finish this one, where I flew through the last three. It takes far too long to get to the action, and even when things begin to happen, they happen very slowly, in the manner of meetings and arguments over the best way to proceed. I understand what he was trying to do, but it was just so hard to stay interested!

Overall, I’d say not the best of his work. I still love the series, and I will probably follow it to its end (it takes more than one bad book to put me off a series altogether). Oh, and if I’ve convinced you to go and read this series, start with Here There Be Dragons, or you will be royally confused!

Upcoming Reviews:
Fire by Kristin Cashore
The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde
Incarceron by Catherine Fisher
Iron Daughter by Julie Kagawa





Book Blogger Hop 7

Sep
10
4 COMMENTS • This post is filed under: Community Events

It’s Friday again! Time for another hop =D Click the button above to join.

This week’s question (isn’t actually a question, but nevermind): Post a link to your favorite post/book review that you have written in the past three months.

My very favorite post is my review of Sherlock (BBC’s recent remake). I just love that show sooo much right now! But as this is a book hop, I think I should also give my favorite book review. For this, I think I’m going to go with my review of CloudWorld by David Cunningham.

Thanks for stopping by! Leave a comment with your blog address and I’ll try and return the favour =)

Recent Reviews:
Peeps by Scott Westerfeld
Going Bovine by Libba Bray

Upcoming Reviews:
The Shadow Dragons by James Owen
Fire by Kristin Cashore





Book Review: Peeps

Sep
09
0 COMMENTS • This post is filed under: Book Review
Peeps Peeps by
Series: Peeps #1
Published by in 2005
Genres: , ,
Pages: 312
Source:
Goodreads

Parasite positives, or "peeps," are maniacal cannibals that cause illness. College freshman Cal was lucky: he contracted the sexually transmitted disease during a one-night stand, but it never developed into its full-blown form. Now he works for an underground bureau in Manhattan that tracks down peeps. Apart from the cravings for rare meat and enforced celibacy (turning lovers into monsters is "not an uplifting thing"), life is okay--until a hip, cute journalism student intensifies Cal's yearnings for companionship.

Review:

One of the things I like about Scott Westerfeld is his ability to take something very unusual and make it seem perfectly normal. In his Uglies trilogy, it was the uber-plastic surgery thing, in Peeps, it’s Vampires. To me, this novel was a breath of fresh air – the Vampires weren’t really creepy, scary inhuman creatures, and they weren’t idolized for their super abilities and possible humanity. They just were. They’re a part of the story, but they aren’t treated differently than any other character in a story would be. After the Twilight craze and all the subsequent “Vampires are soooo COOL!!! SQUEEEEEEE!!!” books, finally, this was something new.

That said, I do have a few complaints. Westerfeld structures the book in chapters, and every other chapter is a short explanation of a different parasite. The first few were interesting – they were relevant to the story and explained things like how the peeps got their “vampirism” and what it did to them. After that it just got old and a little disgusting. I have no desire to read about these little worms that live in your stomach and eat their way out of you (or the ones that live in your bed – especially as I finished reading this one just before bed the other night.)

I also felt the whole thing was a bit tired – while the take on vampires is new, the plot is plenty old, especially looking at spy, and more recently superhero genres. I’m not going to tell you why, because that would probably count as spoiling, but about halfway through I wanted to yell at Cal for being so stupid and not realizing what was going on, and before I was three-quarters through I was just like “really? I mean really? Have you never seen a James Bond movie?” (As he’s 19 and male I find this highly unlikely, but I suppose possible. Still, was he living under a rock?!) Of course if Cal knew all these things, then I suppose we wouldn’t have a story. But it’s still frustrating.

Overall, I would recommend this book to friends (especially the Twilight crazy ones), but it’s not one of those “YOU MUST READ THIS NOW!” books.

Upcoming Reviews:
The Shadow Dragons by James Owen





Book Review: Going Bovine

Sep
08
0 COMMENTS • This post is filed under: Book Review
Going Bovine Going Bovine by
Published by in 2009
Genres: , ,
Pages: 480
Source:
Goodreads

Saving the world. That's impossible. Insane. Still. A cure. I could be cured. That's what she said. And some little atoms come awake inside me, swirling into a question I can't shake: "Why the hell not?" I could have a chance. And a chance is better than nothing.

Review:

It’s been nearly a week since I finished this one. Honestly, I still don’t quite know what to say. It was amazing, and I hated it at the same time. But I hated it for all the right reasons, all the reasons an author wants you to hate a book.

I picked Going Bovine up on a whim. I’d seen it around on blogger and I really didn’t care all that much (though I didn’t know at the time that it was written by Libba Bray, whom I adore). Then I saw it on the shelf in the library, and for lack of anything else to read, decided to pick it up. The teaser was just enough to catch my interest, but boy was I not expecting what I got. I still can’t decide if it was real or not. Or if that even matters.

Cameron starts out as one of those characters you love to hate. He’s an offensive, sullen teenager that reminds us all of that kid in high school that seemed to have a vendetta against everybody. Of course, in high school, we all just wondered what their problem was and moved on. But Cameron has a real problem. Prions are attacking his brain, making him lose control of his muscles and hallucinate. (For those of you who don’t have a degree in medical science, that’s Mad Cow Disease – makes your brain go all spongified).

After several episodes that make you feel almost sorry for Cameron, he is admitted to the hospital where he meets Dulcie. I’m pretty sure Dulcie is one of my favorite side characters ever. She is so enigmatic and yet normal. When she’s there, she’s supposed to be there, and when she’s gone you don’t notice. (Now that I read that back, it sounds like she’s forgettable. That’s not it. It’s just like, she fits where she’s supposed to. And the sort of there/not-there-ness of her character really fits who she is.)

When I think of how to describe this book as a whole, it reminds me of those Rubeus puzzles you had to do in Elementary school (You know, where they made math equations out of words and pictures and you had to figure out what well-known phrase they meant?). Going Bovine = American Gods – adult themes + Percy Jackson + a tiny bit of Looking for Alaska + Libba Bray’s own original touch. It is gorgeous and I would recommend it to anyone!

Upcoming Reviews:
Peeps by Scott Westerfeld
The Shadow Dragons by James Owen





Falling Leaves

Sep
04
1 COMMENT • This post is filed under: Blog Nuts and Bolts

Well, it’s official, at least in my mind. Our lawn is covered with leaves, the weather has finally given us relief from the boiling heat (albeit a brief respite) and we’ve watched our first football game of the season (we won!). All of this, plus the fact that school has started up again means… it’s fall! And for some reason, fall almost always puts me in a very project-y mood (I know, I really need more to do, right?).

Another thing I personally associate with fall is “Oldies.” I don’t know why, but whenever the weather turns cold, I crave those Beatles and Beach Boys hits and the radio in my car gets set on the local oldies station whenever I’m driving somewhere. This combined with my lack of knowledge in the “classic literature” department led me to create:

The “Oldies” project

For this project, I will attempt to read 3 classics before Thanksgiving (possibly the end of November if I’m in the middle of one). That’s only one a month, so I have time to read other stuff, plus do all my homework type reading.
The plan is to read:

1) The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
2) Wuthering Heights by Charlotte Bronte
plus one other, TBD at a later time.
Anyone who would like to join me is welcome – we can keep each other accountable!

Look out for upcoming reviews:
Going Bovine by Libba Bray
Peeps by Scott Westerfeld


 





Media Review: Vampires Suck

Sep
04
0 COMMENTS • This post is filed under: Media Monday

This is gonna be a quick one cause it’s Friday night before a long weekend and I have an unmissable appointment with my pillow. (Seriously. This homework is killing me!) On the other hand, I don’t have too much to say, so that works out really well =)

Title: Vampires Suck
Media Type: Feature Film
Genre: Satire

Wow. It’s not very often something like this comes out that works for me. I hated Epic Movie. Well, actually I gave up after Epic Movie – I’m not much one for Disaster flicks and I didn’t really care about the others either. But Vampires Suck somehow goes out the other end of awful and comes back around to awesome! I mean, of course there were things that were just awful (and unfortunately way too close to the truth which means there’s going to be a lot of unhappy Twi-hards out there). But in my opinion, the girl that played “Kristen Stewart aka Becca” had it down to the point that I was ready to throttle her, “Edward” over-exaggerated his part just the perfect amount and when they started singing “It’s Raining Men” I about died laughing! In fact, if you don’t mind a little bit of spoiler (and unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past few years, there’s nothing in this movie to spoil) go and watch it!

Anyway, that’s my take. Disclaimer: I do not under any circumstances recommend this to anyone under 13 without their parents permission. There are a TON of lewd jokes, and I don’t want to get yelled at for telling someone to go see this when they really shouldn’t.

Have a good weekend – I’ve got lots to do, but I’ll try and get my next review up Sunday.

Upcoming reviews:
Going Bovine by Libba Bray
Peeps by Scott Westerfeld





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